Foxlands & Toad Hall Cottages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Foxlands Cottage was once a barn and is over 100 years old; the markings of the stone steps to the upper storey can be seen in the stone on the gable wall.


Toad Hall was originally two houses dating back to 1890, built of local stone, the walls are over 60cm thick in places. The house is newly converted for use as a holiday home in 2002, with most rooms having been newly furnished. Within the décor, care has been taken to preserve much of the original charm of the Victorian era, features, such as two original fireplaces remain. The internal doors have all been stripped along with floor in the dining room.

Visitors have been coming to Aberfeldy and surrounding area since Queen Victoria spent part of her honeymoon here in 1842 at nearby Taymouth castle. Since then many others have followed suit and escaped from everyday life to enjoy this very special part of Scotland, notably Beatrix Potter, Elizabeth Taylor, Bobby & Jack Charlton, more recently Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling.

The reasons for visiting this genuine all year round destination outnumber the visitors who come here, our list of activities and places of interest illustrate just some. The area truly is the "Heart of Scotland" and is ideal for those who wish to tour and visit the main destinations in all directions. However the beauty of not only Aberfeldy, but also the location of our cottages is that once having arrived here, the driver CAN ALSO HAVE A HOLIDAY!

The cottages are within easy walking distance of Aberfeldy "town" where there are plenty of interesting shops, small supermarkets, restaurants, banks, leisure facilities and even a Distillery. These and many other amenities are in such close proximity that once having arrived, there is no necessity of needing to drive your car!

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

Younger members of the family can wander freely without need to be transported.

For the more mature, the terrain is easy without very steep gradients.